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The fog was rolling in eerily, the waves of the incoming high tide were crashing on the shore and you could smell the salt in the air. It was a front-row view of Mother Nature’s magical and rugged beauty. This is how the morning began on my adventure to the Hopewell Rocks Park.

Foggy morning at the entrance of the Hopewell Rocks park.
Foggy morning at the entrance of the Hopewell Rocks park.

I was greeted at the Baymount Outdoor Adventures office by our tour guide and then set up with the equipment needed for a high tide paddle.

Once on the water, our guide had all the knowledge you could ever want to know about the rocks and how they were formed. I learned so much, even though I had been to this destination many times before. We paddled around and through some of the unique rock formations, something that gave us a look that you do not see from the land.

Paddling to the Hopewell Rocks with Baymount Outdoor Adventures
Paddling to the Hopewell Rocks with Baymount Outdoor Adventures

Shortly after we began the paddle, we crashed into a few good waves, felt the power of the sea and then came a sudden calm as something wondrous happened right in front of us. The wall of fog started to burn off on the horizon and a sunny day was born.

Hopewell Rocks has sandstone sea cliffs that have been carved over thousands of years. The Flower Pot Rocks, trees that grow at the top of the brown stacks, are highly photographed and show the great variance of the highest tides in the world.

Open from late May until mid October, visitors to Hopewell Rocks can walk on the ocean floor at the base of these giant formations three hours before and after low tide. At Hopewell Cape, high tide can be anywhere from 9.75 to 14 metres (32 to 46 feet).

Tiny kayaks under the giant rocks
Tiny kayaks under the giant rocks

We paddled all the way to Demoiselle Beach, an experience I would recommend even if you are not an avid kayaker. These kayaks are very stable and the highly experienced guides are there to support you. A side note, have a change of clothes ready!

We were on foot for the second part of the day. We walked on the ocean floor, but in a different and less known area of Hopewell Rocks. We met up with Kevin Snair and headed one kilometre down to Demoiselle Beach and Demoiselle Rocks.

A walk on the beach at The Hopewell Rocks Park
A walk on the beach at The Hopewell Rocks Park

In the early days, these rocks were named by sailors who thought they looked like a lineup of ladies. The name stuck, and so did the history.

There is also a rock formation accessible at low tide called “Double eye of the needle”. It is a great spot to take photos. After walking across the beach, we went to the restaurant and then headed to L’Anse Big Cove lookout where we saw a family of Peregrine Falcons nesting in the cliffs.

We even witnessed a feeding as the mom arrived with some food for the little ones. If you’re interested, you can take a look at these babies now and see how they are progressing on the Hopewell Rocks Facebook page.

Shoreline from above at The Hopewell Rocks Park
Shoreline from above at The Hopewell Rocks Park

This unique destination is a great day experience for the family and the adventurous spirit in all of us. It is much more than a one-time place to visit because every day can bring something different. It can be foggy, sunny, warm or cool, but one certainty is it is always fun!